Snell to Demo 3D Switching - Broadcasting & Cable

Snell to Demo 3D Switching

Will also unveil automation, processing products
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Video processing, routing and automation provider Snell will address the industry's buzz over 3D by demonstrating how a stereoscopic 3D production can be delivered through its popular Kahuna switcher.

According to Snell Chief Marketing Officer Neil Maycock, the company will show a stereo image on a single M/E (mix/effect) bank with the left and right eye images out of alignment, and then correct the problem within the switcher. Maycock said there is a strong interest in 3D production among Snell's OB (outside broadcast) truck customers, but he doesn't expect to do any meaningful 3D business this year.

That said, he thinks it is vitally important for an image processing specialist like Snell to be actively involved in 3D development, including areas such as standards conversion and 3D monitoring.

"It's like HD, in that the timing will be critical as to when you jump," said Maycock. "But you have got to be actively engaged and seen to be part of the process."

3D switching is just one of the new features Snell is touting with its "Kahunaverse," an umbrella term for the production capabilities of the Kahuna switcher. Another is Galaxy, an event list tool that brings live-assist automation to production.

On the traditional automation front, Snell will also launch version two of its Morpheus automation product, with an expanded feature set and full ratification for running on a Virtual Machine environment. Snell will also demonstrate a playout solution that runs on its Morpheus automation software and Morpheus ICE, Snell's station-in-a-box product that starts in the $40,000 range. Other new ICE features include support for the 720p HD format as well as closed-captioning.

On the video processing front, Snell will introduce Archangel Ph.C - HD, an advanced SD and HD restoration system with real-time dirt, dust, grain, noise, scratch, instability and flicker removal. That product, which has previously existed in SD-only form, is aimed at programmers looking to fully monetize their archives.

"It will clean and upconvert SD content and clean up HD product visually," said Maycock. "A lot of stuff that comes from film has artifacts, and so you have artifacts going from film to video. There are post processes to remove them, but they are not real-time. This can do it 90% in real-time."

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