Pew Research Pioneer Andrew Kohut Dies

Had helped create center and define its mission
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Andrew Kohut, 73, who headed the Pew Research Center from 2004 until 2012, and before that the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press starting in 1993, died of complications from Leukemia Sept. 8 at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore.

"We at Pew Research Center live this every day, in an organization whose principles, methods and approach to doing research were forged by his leadership," said Pew Research Center president Michael Dimock. "He taught us the importance of innovation, relevance, rigor, objectivity, humility, and ultimately, getting it right. Andy’s values and mission drive the center, and we continue to strive to live up to the standard he set."

“It has been more than 20 years since Andy and I began working together to create the Pew Research Center," said Rebecca Rimel, president and CEO of The Pew Charitable Trusts. "In the decades since, he has been an inspiration, a mentor, a friend and a wonderful colleague. The board of directors of The Pew Charitable Trusts join me in mourning his loss, but we are also grateful for his remarkable contribution to advancing the founders’ credo: Tell the truth and trust the people.”

Kohut was president of Gallup from 1979 to 1989 and founded Princeton Survey Research Associates, which specializes in media, politics and public policy polls. He was also founding director of surveys for Times Mirror Center.

He was a past president of the American Association for Public Opinion Research and the National Council on Public Polls and a commentator for NPR, the PBS NewsHour and others.

He is survived by his wife, Diane Colasanto; sister Rosellen Cutter; a son, Matthew Kohut; daughter, Amy Kohut; stepson, Nicholas Cohn; and grandchild, Jack Kohut.

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