Orioles Great, MASN Broadcaster Mike Flanagan Dies

Found Wednesday in his Maryland home
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The Mid-Atlantic Sports Network was paying tribute online Thursday to former Orioles Cy Young award-winning pitcher and broadcaster Mike Flanagan, who died Wednesday night at his Maryland home, MASN said the Orioles had confirmed.  No cause of death was given.

Flanagan, 59, had been broadcasting Orioles games for MASN since last season.

"It is with deep sadness that I learned of the death of my friend Mike Flanagan," Orioles managing partner Peter Angelos said in a statement on the club's Web site. "In over a quarter century with the organization, Flanny became an integral part of the Orioles family, for his accomplishments both on and off the field.  His loss will be felt deeply and profoundly by all of us with the ballclub and by Orioles fans everywhere who admired him. "

The Orioles won their first road series in three months Wednesday night, but "nothing that happened on Target Field tonight seems important after the news that former Orioles pitcher, coach, executive and broadcaster Mike Flanagan died," said MASN on-air personality and blogger Roch Kubatko in a post after the game. "I'm only 25 so I don't remember Flanny pitching, but I do remember him calling games and all I've wanted since I heard the news tonight was to hear his voice one more time," replied a fan online. "He represented a sense of normalcy for me as well, when life got crazy and sometimes downright depressing, the one thing I could count on was turning on the games during the summer and listening to him."

Flanagan had a career record of 167-143 in 18 seasons with the Orioles and Toronto Blue Jays and won the Cy Young in 1979 when he went 23-9 with a 3.08 ERA for the Orioles. He was also on the 1983 World Championship team. He also worked as a pitching coach for the Orioles after his playing days and as an executive in the back office until exiting the club at the end of 2009.

Flanagan had a career record of 167-143 and won the Cy Young in 1979. He also worked as a pitching coach for the Orioles after his playing days and as an executive in the back office -- ultimately EVP, baseball operations -- until exiting the club at the end of 2009.

Flanagan  was a third generation pro baseball player--his father and grandfather played for the Red Sox organization. He is survived by his wife, Alex, and three daughters.

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