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McSlarrow Poised to Replace NCTA's Sachs - Broadcasting & Cable

McSlarrow Poised to Replace NCTA's Sachs

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The National Cable & Telecommunications Association is close to naming Department of Energy aide Kyle McSlarrrow as president of the industry trade group, Washington sources said.

McSlarrow announced last week that his resignation as an agency deputy secretary and chief operating officer would be effective in February. The Virginia native has served in the Energy Department since the beginning of President Bush’s first term.

NCTA officials would not confirm McSlarrow’s hiring.

He first served as chief of staff to Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham before becoming deputy secretary in 2002. Abraham has high praise for this exiting aide. “Perhaps his greatest accomplishment has been in overseeing the dramatic change in how this department is managed,” Abraham said in a prepared statement when McSlarrow announced plans to leave the agency.

He noted that reforms implemented under McSlarrow’s watch prompted the department to be rated the best-managed Cabinet agency by the White House Office of Management and Budget.

In 2001, the agency had been rated worst managed by OMB.
As the department’s COO, McSlarrow oversaw an agency with over 100,000 federal and contractor employees, 17 national labs, and a budget of $23 billion. McSlarrow’s resignation is effective in early February. McSlarrow also served as chief of staff to the late Sen. Paul Coverdell and as deputy chief of staff and chief counsel to former Senate Majority Leaders Bob Dole and Trent Lott.

McSlarrow would replace Robert Sachs, who announced in June that he will step down after a replacement is in place.

McSlarrow joins the largest trade group as the industry is gearing up for legislative battles over rewriting the telecommunications act. A key part of that battle will be lawmakers’ effort to set rules for cable’s delivery of Internet telephone service and phone companies’ plans to roll out TV service over their phone lines.

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