Briefs - Broadcasting & Cable

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Not Surprising...

Movielink reports that the movie downloaded most often through its service for the week of July 7-13 was Star Trek Nemesis, which is probably not unlikely given the highly probable overlap between those who would be interested in downloading a movie onto a computer and those who are Star Trek fans. The other top five movies for the week were Adaptation, Analyze That, A Guy Thing and The Pianist.

DIG Digs DIG Motion

ESPN.com's successful launch of ESPN Motion, which brings motion video to the Web site without the need for heavy streaming tools, has led to its launch on fellow Disney Internet Group sites Movies.com and ABC.com. DIG Motion technology launches short full-motion video clips by preloading the video onto the user's computer, removing the problems associated with buffering. And because the video is embedded directly in Web pages, a secondary video window or media-player window is not required. DIG plans to use it to bring new advertising opportunities to the sites as well as content clips.

TiVo's Got Mail

America Online members can now program their TiVo personal video recorders through their AOL service. The free service requires members to go to the AOL's TV listings and then click on a show they would like to record. They click a button called "Record to my TiVo DVR," and the command is sent to the TiVo unit (as long as it's a Series 2 TiVo). AOL subscribers can also manage their TiVo recording preferences. America Online says the service will also be available via cell phones, pagers and PDAs soon.

GoldPocket Goes Banzai

Fox's Banzai is using the Internet and text messaging to allow viewers to play along at home with the help of GoldPocket Interactive. According to GoldPocket, the technology combines Internet functionality with the ease of use that cross-carrier SMS short-code text messaging provides. Internet participants can also chat with friends and see results of Banzai polls. And wireless subscribers to all major SMS-enabled carriers can use text messaging to weigh in on the show's stunts.

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