TV Review: NBC's 'About A Boy' - Broadcasting & Cable

TV Review: NBC's 'About A Boy'

Sitcom debuts on Feb. 22 at 11:07 p.m.
Author:
Publish date:

NBC launches the Minnie Driver starrer About a Boy out of its primetime coverage of the Winter Olympics on Feb. 22. About a Boy is based on the 1998 Nick Hornsby novel, which generated the 2002 Hugh Grant flick of the same name. Below is a compilation of reviews compiled by B&C from around the web.

"Although the series shares the basic DNA of the Will-Marcus relationship, it differs in geography, trading London for San Francisco; in Will's source of income, royalties from his own hit Christmas song, instead of his father's; and in the mental state of Fiona, who isn't suicidal and has a more substantial role than mere antagonist. The series also burns through much of the book's plot in its first episode."
--Bill Keveney, USA Today

"In short, in this version, rather startlingly run by Jason Katims, who did much better work (to say the least) adapting Friday Night Lights and Parenthood, both Will and Marcus have been drained of the profound sadness that made anything about the original About A Boy feel like it mattered."
--Linda Holmes, NPR

"About a Boy could also use more of Driver — the worry is that the writers are making her too one-dimensional in her over-protectiveness and earthy-crunchiness."
--Tim Goodman, The Hollywood Reporter

"Resuscitating the story for American television more than a decade later feels like a delayed and unnecessary reaction. This is, after all, a story that was originally set in 1993 London and named for the Nirvana song 'About a Girl.'"
--Christopher Muther, The Boston Globe

"The problem with turning a romantic comedy movie into a TV show is the inability to have a climax, figuratively or otherwise. Beyond that disclaimer, About a Boy is an utterly charming pilot, and almost certainly the most endearing half-hour NBC has developed in some time."
--Brian Lowry, Variety

"The show was created by Jason Katims (Parenthood), who brings a writer's sense of character to the script. The show is funny, warm and bloody irresistible because of the care taken with creating characters who are multidimensional, vulnerable and credible."
--David Wiegand, The San Francisco Chronicle

Related