TV Review: AMC’s ‘Humans’ - Broadcasting & Cable

TV Review: AMC’s ‘Humans’

Science fiction drama premieres June 28 at 9 p.m.
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AMC’s science fiction drama Humans premieres June 28 at 9 p.m. ET. The series is set in a parallel reality where robotic servants are the new must-have technology. The series explores the blurring lines between humanity and machines. The series stars Tom Goodman-Hill, Gemma Chan, Katherine Parkinson, William Hurt, Colin Morgan, Rebecca Front and Neil Maskell. The following are reviews from TV critics around the web, compiled by B&C.

“Anyway, there’s a lot going on in this show, which is being billed as an eight-episode series. Some of it is familiar from previous takes on artificial life, some of it is innovative, but all of it is involving, well written and well played. And though this is a drama, it is also served up with dashes of humor.”
—Neil Genzlinger, New York Times

"Moreover, the AI elements borrow from such a multitude of sources that watching the show — at least for those who have seen some of the movies or read the books the program evokes — is as much an archaeological experience as a dramatic one. The tinges of familiarity range from I, Robot to Westworld to even the rebellious primate servants in the original Planet of the Apes series."
—Brian Lowry, Variety

"In the first two episodes, Humans looks like a promising excursion into familiar territory, and one that plays well on several levels. It’s a domestic drama, a sci-fi thriller, and a meditation on alienation, all wrapped up in one sleek package."
—Emily L. Stephens, A.V. Club

"We've certainly seen plenty of robots wreaking havoc on humanity. But Humans finds a way to bring intrigue to a very familiar conflict."
—Tim Goodman, The Hollywood Reporter

"Unlike so many hyper-stylized American prestige dramas, it wants to be a sturdy vessel for plot and ideas, not Emmy bait. The result is a cohesive and consistently engaging viewing hour that hopscotches between a variety of story types: chase, horror, comedy."
—Spencer Kornhaber, The Atlantic

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