Credit: truTV

Andrea Savage’s Unapologetic Comedy Debuts on truTV

‘I’m Sorry’ comes from a woman who does not say it very often

Andrea Savage, star of truTV comedy I’m Sorry, won’t be partying when the show premieres Wednesday. She’ll be live tweeting and using Facebook Live to connect with fans.

“They put you to work these days,” Savage says. “There’s no rest for the very, very weary.”

truTV described the show as being about “a seemingly confident, together comedy writer, wife and mom, who is forced to expose her inner immaturity and neuroses as life hands her situations no one could have prepared her for.”

Savage says I’m Sorry’s influences include Curb Your Enthusiasm, Louie and Master of None, shows with a unique point of view. “The logline is not a sexy logline,” Savage says. “It’s a person navigating through their life.”

There are some big names among the I’m Sorry producers, including Will Ferrell and Adam McKay from Funny or Die and Andy Samberg, Jorma Taccone and Akiva Schaffer, who make up The Lonely Island. She knew Ferrell and McKay from the 2008 movie Step Brothers (Ferrell starred, McKay directed, and Savage was in the cast). The Lonely Island guys “come from a similar comedy background,” says Savage. “We all want to do unique, cool shows, something different.”

Savage says the I’m Sorry title is a riff on “a term in the zeitgeist” and admits she’s “not terribly apologetic.”

The project started with Savage shooting a 14-minute version of I’m Sorry to give prospective partners a better feel for it than a script would provide. She admits she was not familiar with truTV a few years ago but says the network has fully supported her in bringing I’m Sorry to life. “They let you do the show you want to do,” says Savage.

She also likes that truTV, formerly Court TV, is recasting itself, breaking from its reality past to more comedy. “The idea of being on a network that is defining themselves is pretty exciting,” she says.

Savage’s work includes playing Laura Montez—that’s President Laura Montez—on Veep, along with a part in Hulu satire The Hotwives of Las Vegas and plenty of movie roles too. She says I’m Sorry represents a unique career achievement for her. “There’s something about finally getting your passion/dream show, later in your career,” Savage says, “that’s really kind of lovely.”