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NAB Redesigns Logo, Tag Line

National Association of Broadcasters: ‘Advocacy Education Innovation’ 1/07/2008 11:30:00 AM Eastern

The National Association of Broadcasters came up with a new logo and tag line -- its first logo revamp in 20 years, the association said.


The logo -- the letters NAB in a less bulky type face than before and preceded by overlapping orange and grey bars -- is meant to "embody our reinvigorated sense of advocacy," president and CEO David Rehr said, as well as an expanding digital presence.

The new tag line is "Advocacy Education Innovation." The NAB will need to do lots of all three.

On the advocacy front, as broadcasters make the switch to digital, they are pushing for help from the Federal Communications Commission in securing cable multicast must-carry, in preventing the use of unlicensed devices in the DTV spectrum and in looking to avoid public-interest-programming quotas in a new reporting-requirement proposal at the commission.

Broadcasters are also working to block the merger of XM Satellite Radio and Sirius Satellite Radio.

Education is a big part of the NAB's charter going forward as it tries to make sure no viewer is surprised by the February 2009 cutoff of analog service.

As for innovation, broadcasters will need to keep finding new, digital ways to deliver their service -- mobile is one growth area -- to be competitive.

The remake was the handiwork of Pittsburgh-based Blattner Brunner, with clients that run the gamut from AARP to Zippo lighters.

Tim Weinheimer, VP, director of account management, at Blattner Brunner in Washington, said the five transparent and overlapping bars in the logo were meant to indicate "motion and activity" and combined both the bands that represent an equalizer "suggesting sound or radio," as well as the blocks of information encoded in digital and high-definition television, symbolizing TV. Grouping and overlapping the different color bars was meant to suggest "community and diversity,:" he said, and to give NAB a "color zone" different from competing organizations.

March