‘Page Six TV’ Helps Stations Make the Show Their Own

Offers frequent talk-backs, custom promos and plenty of social media assets

Why This Matters

Stations are increasingly leaning into their local programming advantage, and syndicators need to help them do this.

Twentieth Television’s new entertainment news program, Page Six TV, is working hard not just to break news, but also to hand-deliver that news to its TV station affiliates, complete with talkbacks, custom promos, Facebook Live sessions and loads of social media assets.

“We are creating materials for stations that are special, different and unique,” said Vivi Zigler, president of digital, brand and audience development at Endemol Shine North America, which produces the show. “We talk to our stations all the time, and we’re always providing them with topicals, photos, clips and something we call the ‘Page Six Fix,’ which we offer once a week both as a 20- and 60-second standalone. Stations can run these in their news or in ad avails as a promo.”

Page Six TV is so responsive to stations that when they requested weekly wrap-ups, Page Six’s producers were quick to provide them.

“TV stations have more avails over the weekends,” Zigler said, “and they can run these both on-air and on social.”

Page Six TV’s talent also are making themselves readily available to do talk-backs with stations, both in their locally-produced programs and in newscasts.

“We’ve done many talk-backs with Page Six TV on both The Buzz and The Jason Show,” said Burke Daneman, VP of creative services for Fox’s Minneapolis- St. Paul duopoly of KMSP and WFTC. The two locally-produced shows air on KMSP Minneapolis- St. Paul at 9 a.m. and 10 a.m., respectively, while Page Six TV airs on MyNet affiliate WFTC at 8 p.m., and at 12:05 a.m. on KMSP. “We would love to have more of these talk-backs on a regular basis if we could figure it out technically.”

WFTC has just been rebranded this fall as Fox 9 Plus, and Daneman and duopoly general manager Sheila Oliver see Page Six TV as a good addition to the station’s new primetime lineup.

“It’s doing well, considering it just popped up about a month ago,” Daneman said. “It was really good timing for us. We have a local news show at 7 p.m. that leads into it.”

So far, Page Six TV’s overall ratings are modest, with the show averaging a 0.7 live plus same day national household rating, according to Nielsen. In the key women 25-54 demographic, it’s tied with CBS Television Distribution’s fellow rookie Daily Mail TV at a 0.5. Working against the show is that it’s cleared in many late-fringe time slots on smaller MyNet and independent stations across the country.

Still, many stations are seeing time-period growth as a result of Page Six TV.

On Fox flagship station WNYW New York, Page Six TV is improving its noon time period among daytime’s key demographic of women 25-54 by 83% with a 1.1 rating/9 share in the week ended Oct. 29. Last year at this time, CBS Television Distribution’s Inside Edition aired in the time slot.

On KTBC in Austin, Texas, at 11:30 p.m., the show is averaging a 1.1/4, up 57% from what Twentieth’s The Simpsons did in the time period last year. On KPTV Portland, Ore., at 11:30 p.m., it averaged a 1.3/5, a 30% improvement from Warner Bros.’ 2 Broke Girls in the time slot last year. On WZTV Nashville at 11:30 p.m., Page Six TV is averaging a 0.9/2, up 50% from Warner Bros.’ TMZ. And on WKBW Buffalo at 1:30 a.m., Page Six averaged a 0.9/3, up 125% from what a court-show block was doing last year.

The show also serves a multiplatform branding purpose for parent company 21st Century Fox, and helped drive its website pagesix.com to a record October, said Jesse Angelo, New York Post CEO and publisher and Page Six TV executive producer.

“There is an increased awareness of this brand,” he said. “We’re in this for the marathon, not the sprint. We’re committed to making sure the show gets better and better every day and we’re seeing a lift across all of our properties.”

Overall, Page Six TV might be indicating a new trend toward localism in syndication, although shows such as TMZ, which also airs on Fox stations, also work hard to service their station partners, and Tegna’s Daily Blast Live has also been designed specifically to air as a national, local and digital vehicle.

“Shows coming out like Page Six are, to me, much more in tune with their stations than typical syndicated product,” said Daneman. “Page Six TV is interested in hearing our feedback and it is definitely a two-way street.”