BC Review

Big Shots: ABC

9/27/2007 06:29:15 AM

"ABC did manage to salvage “Brothers & Sisters” after a rocky start, so there’s potential hope for “Big Shots,” even if CBS has ratcheted up the Thursday competition by returning “Without a Trace” to that night. Still, if it’s really true that these men are “the new women,” so far, I frankly liked the old ones better." (Variety) "Big Shots," which premieres tonight at 10 on Channel 5, is an extremely unflattering showcase for these actors, particularly McDermott, whose overacting as the show’s bad boy puts the mug in smug. Without a hint of dramatic honesty, the series seems to have been manufactured solely for demographic purposes, as a sort of "Desperate Husbands" to pick up the largely female viewership of its lead-in, "Grey’s Anatomy." (Boston Globe) “Big Shots” would have arguably infuriated very few had it presented itself as a more vicious satire of the one-hundredth of the one percent. But it doesn’t fail us miserably in evoking the imperiousness of the upper classes." (NY Times) "As with other "Desperate" clones, "Big Shots" tries way too hard to be shocking and raunchy. The actors resemble kiddies at school trying to impress one another with the latest naughty word learned in gym class. And the more "adult" that writer and series creator Jon Harmon Feldman tries to be, the more juvenile the show seems to become." (Washington Post) "If the rap against Sex and the City in its early seasons was that the women sounded like gay men, the problem with Big Shots is that the men don’t sound like anyone at all, male or female. It’s as if the show has uncovered some new, alien race in which the male-substitute life forms sit around pools in plush, white robes saying things like: "Men. We’re the new women." (USA Today) "At least that increasingly absurd soap has some heart. McDermott and Vartan try, but their new show’s "earnest" emotion and its "light touch" both feel painted on like coats of whitewash. And where "Desperate Housewives" and "Grey’s Anatomy" each arrived as a zesty original, "Big Shots" is a contrived amalgam without much purpose, except to fill an hour of ABC airtime. It doesn’t seem likely to succeed even at that." (Newsday) "Big Shots" is a big waste. If, as one character proclaims, "Men are the new women," then it’s time to defend women’s rights all over again. Men, women, transvestites - everyone deserves better than this." ( NY Daily News)

To view a preview clip of Big Shots, check out B&C’s fall preview section.

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